Author: Artomity Magazine

New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90s

New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90sUntil April 24, 2022  Hong Kong Museum of Art (HKMoA)10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong KongMon – Wed, Fri 10am – 6pmSat, Sun, Public holidays 10am – 7pm The development of Hong Kong art reached a critical juncture in the 1980s and 1990s. Numerous young artists, having graduated in Hong Kong or returned to the city after studying aboard, dedicated themselves to exploring new artistic forms and expressions through their creations. This enabled the rise of installation art, new media, contemporary photography, etc., and brought vibrancy to art creation in Hong Kong. The New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90s exhibition being held at the Hong Kong Museum of Art (HKMoA) examines the new trends and breakthroughs in contemporary art in Hong Kong during the era.  With a two-year project of interviews, research and consolidation, the HKMoA worked closely with guest curator Janet Fong and her team, and invites visitors to look at the breakthroughs and accomplishments of Hong Kong artists …

Dai Fujiwara The Road of My Cyber Physical Hands at HKDI Gallery

Until March 28, 2021 (Closed on Tuesdays) / Hong Kong Design Institute & Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education / (Lee Wai Lee), 3 King Ling Rd, Tseung Kwan O, NT /  新界將軍澳景嶺路3號香港知專設計學院HKDI Gallery Registration required: https://hkdigallery_daifujiwara_admission.eventbrite.com  HKDI Gallery is honoured to stage the exhibition Dai Fujiwara The Road of My Cyber Physical Hands, the renowned Japanese designer Dai Fujiwara’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong, co-organised with DAIFUJIWARA AND COMPANY. Bringing creativity to textiles, product design and beyond, Dai Fujiwara is a designer who continues to transcend creative borders. This exhibition features a first ever look into his earliest works from his time as a design student, tracing the road he has travelled through to his most recent creations. The exhibition at HKDI Gallery is a conversation between the present and the future, capturing Fujiwara’s journey through different realms, from nature and technology to design, art, community and society; and travels through the past, present and future, blurring the borders of each. 

A cross-media live performance – In Sync: Music in Motion

In Sync: Music in Motion /Mar 20 – 21 Saturday – Sunday /Freespace, Art Park, West Kowloon Cultural District (MTR Kowloon Station Exit E)$180 (No handling fee) Hong Kong music and video artists join forces to present a cross-media live performance. Musicians including Olivier Cong, Fung Lam, Mike Yip, Narbi, Bowen Li and the newly-formed Freespace Ensemble perform various genre-defying music. Simultaneously, video artists exhibit visually stunning short films in the background, creating an innovative audio-visual experience. Buy tickets now. The programme is a celebration of rearrangements, featuring a revamped version of Olivier Cong’s spellbinding The Interpretation of Milou’s Dream with Linus Chan’s video. The audio-visual piece tells an introspective story and brings solace after an isolating year. The Freespace Ensemble, a new group-in-residence at Freespace, will make their debut by playing Fung Lam’s rearranged pieces, including Reminiscence (taken from Hong Kong Episodes), under the backdrop of the visual works by Jess Lau Ching-wa and Anthony Lai. Mike Yip will collaborate with Narbi and Bowen Li to twine their compositions around the films by Prescott Law Ho-pui and Wong …

Reopening: Francis Alÿs and Mika Rottenberg at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tai Kwun Contemporary has reopened on March 4! / Wet feet __ dry feet: borders and gamesSolo exhibition by Francis AlÿsCurators: Xue Tan, Sunjung KimCo-presented with Art Sonje SeoulNow till March 28 SNEEZESolo exhibition by Mika RottenbergCurator: Tobias BergerPresenter: Tai Kwun ContemporaryNow till March 31 Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong 10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTuesday to Sunday, 11am – 7pm 𝘞𝘦𝘵 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵 __ 𝘥𝘳𝘺 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵: 𝘣𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘨𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘴 gathers for the first time in Hong Kong important recent works by Francis Alÿs, one of the most influential conceptual artists of our time. Presented on the 1/F, the exhibition is structured around the artist’s interests in migration and borders, and his fascination with children’s games from around the world. This solo exhibition highlights his poetic, imaginative sensibility, anchored by geopolitical concerns and individual will while being grounded in everyday life.⁠ We are excited to welcome all visitors again with the debut presentation of Francis Alÿs’s two newly commissioned videos that he specially created in Hong Kong for Tai Kwun Contemporary. Mika Rottenberg’s 𝙎𝙉𝙀𝙀𝙕𝙀 also continues on the 3/F gallery, presenting immersive video installations about surreal alternative worlds of global everyday …

Ng Tsz-kwan 吳子昆

A multimedia artist and designer, Ng Tsz-kwan (b.1972) proposes various and reflexive modes of artistic experience based on a poetics of language that unfolds at the borderline of performance. Ng graduated from The Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1997 with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts, and later earned his master’s at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. In 2006, he co-founded multimedia design company Yucolab. His artistic practice draws from these experiences yet also departs from them. It mainly develops in two experimental directions: immersive, multisensory installations and space-oriented installations based on decontextualised, fragmented moving images. For Ng, “What we see is how we see”. His installations often question and explore the medium of the cinema and the relationships that the audience entertains with moving images in order to open up the space between them. Recently, he created an automated mobile chair that travels along a railway track within the exhibition space, a way for viewers to encounter his works while in motion, on a journey he controls. He disengages from narratives and linear …

Kung Chi Shing

By Aaina Bhargava / The first part of Kung Chi Shing’s haunting video City Inside a Broken Sky, Deep Night alternates black-and-white imagery of a construction site amid debris and scaffolding, the colonial-era building of the Oil Street Art Space, and a young boy. Familiar construction noises are interspersed with occasional wailing, an eerie, melancholic sound conveying despair. “Dark in every sense,” in the artist’s own words, the video is the first of four in a series called Soundscape, a meditation on the implications of construction, the use of public space and the city itself. “Construction involves destruction,” he says. “When you destroy something, you’re erasing something that came before it, and Hong Kong is famous for erasing. Every few months an old building is gone, an old space is destroyed to build a new one.” Soundscape was created to mark Oil Street Art Space’s expansion. With two galleries housed in a complex of historical significance, its expansion will include an indoor gallery, and an outdoor venue that will be open to the public. The …

BOOKED: 2021 Art Book Pop-Ups

Feb 25 – 28, 2021Feb 25, 3 – 7pmFeb 26 – ⁠28, 12 – ⁠7pm Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongWeb Various venues in Block 01, 03, 09Free of charge BOOKED: 2021, Tai Kwun Contemporary’s third annual celebration of art and publishing, features over 80 local and non-local participants—including artists, publishers, organisations, booksellers and more—presenting artist-made and artist-centred books, including zines, photo books, monographs, and critical or experimental writing, alongside associated publications and ephemera. This year, due to the pandemic, BOOKED: 2021 is presented within various “pop-ups” throughout the heritage buildings at Blocks 01, 03, and 09, around the Parade Ground of Tai Kwun, and will adhere to the latest health and safety regulations and enforce social distancing measures. As a special “boutique” edition, BOOKED: 2021 brings together not only Hong Kong-based participants but also non-locals contributing from a distance through a special “twin” partner programme. BOOKED: 2021 also offers a programme of editions, special projects, and talks and workshops, both on-site and online, fostering a platform for creative practitioners and publishers who are invested in books as a medium …

unconstrained tone 亂調

soundpocket / Hong Kong / Dec 11-17, 2020 / Jacqueline Leung / Originally conceived as a series of live performances in May, unconstrained tone was an online screening of seven new audiovisual works by 19 emerging Hong Kong artists. The culmination of a year-long project, it aimed to let participating artists, mostly from composition and videography backgrounds, experiment with ways of bringing sound and image together. Despite its postponement and digital presentation, much of unconstrained tone remained in the here and now. Each work was only up for 24 hours, after which it could no longer be viewed. The programme opened with Synchronization (2020), a multimedia improvisation by musician Kong Chan and filmmaker Wong Hoi-yin. In a dark interior, a dancer moved to music performed using dongxiao flute, electronic sound effects and The World of Dreams, a set of lyrics composed by Hong Yi, an eminent Buddhist monk, sung in the Cantonese naamyam singing tradition. The dancer’s movements were processed by a visual mixer and projected onto the wall, producing illusory shadows that in turn informed the musicians’ playing. A work of simultaneous creation, Synchronization formally embodies the harmony of life’s cycles and of existence, …

Andio Lai 黎仲民

By John Batten / Andio Lai’s path as an artist has been refreshingly indirect. Each personal misstep and doubt forced a self-assessment and redirection to where he is now – and “now” does not necessarily refer to his status as a visual artist. It is a label that sits uncomfortably for him, but if the word “artist” is associated with musicians, cartoonists, gamers, players and those that draw creative stories, then it is a little closer to being an accurate description. After finishing secondary school, Lai – as was expected by the traditional school he attended – began studies at Monash University in Melbourne, on track for a career in business. He settled into university alongside close school friends from Hong Kong during his first-year foundation course, but the following year he found the first-year economics degree courses much less satisfying than reading the campus library’s selection of sci-fi books. Unhappy with his studies, realising he was not cut out to be a businessman and mildly homesick, he returned to Hong Kong in late 2009. …