Author: Artomity Magazine

South Island Art Day

29 March 201910am –2pm 16 of the South Island Cultural District (SICD) galleries and artist studios open their doors as part of Art Basel Hong Kong and Art Central VIP Programmes. Yet this exceptional event is also open to the general public and the admission is free. Following highly successful South Island Art Days over the past 5 years, the SICD is expecting around 2000 local and international art lovers, collectors and curators to attend the event held in Hong Kong’s new destination for contemporary art. Art Day ProgramSICD promises an exciting and varied programme giving visitors the opportunity to see 16 exceptional exhibitions, interact with local and international artists, attend unique performances, join guided tours as well as enjoy free food and drink from its south side partners. Outdoor Installations and PerformancesBeside the indoor contemporary art exhibitions and performances, SICD runs an outdoor installation programme. While walking from one gallery to another, visitors will be able to experience installations by Kacey Wong and David Boyce scattered along the streets of Wong Chuk Hang. During a four …

Sebastian Stöhrer / Caroline Chiu Studio, Hong Kong

March 23 – 29, 2019 Opening: Saturday, March 23, 2 – 6.30pm Artist Talk with Ilaria Maria Sala: March 23, 4 – 5pm  South Island Art Day: March 29, 10am – 6pmArtist Talk: 29 March, 5 – 6pm  Caroline Chiu Studio, in collaboration with Carl Freedman Gallery, is proud to present an exhibition of new sculptures by German artist Sebastian Stöhrer. The exhibition features 15 works inspired by the artist’s 2017 Travel Residency in China (sponsored by Caroline Chiu Studio), which included glaze research and site visits in Jingdezhen, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Many of the works are inspired by ancient Chinese masterpieces, traditions and discoveries that the artist made on his travels.   Stöhrer’s quirky, colourful vessels take on various shapes and sizes, and are united by a fluidity that defies their weight. The application and balance of colour are central to the artist’s creative process. Stöhrer has created and continues to perfect his own personal alchemy of glazing. His hand, chemistry and kiln come together and hatch beautifully balanced, vibrant, unique sculptures with their own …

Sebastian Stöhrer / Caroline Chiu Studio, Hong Kong

March 23 – 29, 2019 Opening: Saturday, March 23, 2 – 6.30pm Artist Talk with Ilaria Maria Sala: March 23, 4 – 5pm  South Island Art Day: March 29, 10am – 6pmArtist Talk: 29 March, 5 – 6pm  Caroline Chiu Studio, in collaboration with Carl Freedman Gallery, is proud to present an exhibition of new sculptures by German artist Sebastian Stöhrer. The exhibition features 15 works inspired by the artist’s 2017 Travel Residency in China, which included glaze research and site visits in Jingdezhen, Shanghai and Hong Kong. Many of the works are inspired by ancient Chinese masterpieces, traditions and discoveries that the artist made on his travels.   Stöhrer’s quirky, colourful vessels take on various shapes and sizes, and are united by a fluidity that defies their weight. The application and balance of colour are central to the artist’s creative process. Stöhrer has created and continues to perfect his own personal alchemy of glazing. His hand, chemistry and kiln come together and hatch beautifully balanced, vibrant, unique sculptures with their own innate personas. Many of these new …

Asia Art Archive March Programmes 2019

In March, Asia Art Archive (AAA) is presenting talks, activities, and exhibitions highlighting our ongoing research initiative on performance art. Join us for our annual artist’s lecture to be delivered by Zhang Peili, view an exhibition on the Lee Wen Archive, and visit our display on the history of performance art in our booth at Art Basel in Hong Kong. Exhibition | Form Colour ActionOn view at AAA Library, Form Colour Action: Sketchbooks and Notebook of Lee Wenexplores drawing as a site of performance. With materials from the archive of Lee Wen, a pioneering artist in performance art in Asia, the exhibition brings together his sketchbooks and notebooks—on display for the first time—as well as documentation of his performance works. The selection shows multiple alter egos that Lee created, and early manifestations of development use of the performing body as a medium that understands the individual as a part of the body politic. Click here for more information. Date: 13 March–29 June 2019Venue: Asia Art Archive Library, 11/F, Hollywood Centre233 Hollywood Road, Sheung Wan Annual Artist’s Lecture | Zhang …

Ethan Murrow

We Travel in Our Minds / Duddell’s / Hong Kong / Oct 10 – Mar 10 / Christine Chan Chiu We Travel in Our Minds was the latest guest-curated exhibition that Duddell’s presented for its third consecutive autumn programme, with the aim of showcasing unique, rarely seen items from private Hong Kong collections. It highlighted unusual pieces from three collections in the Duddell’s library, replacing the books on its shelves as objects conveying knowledge, culture and history. They were complemented by a series of meticulously executed black-and-white wall drawings by Boston-based artist Ethan Murrow. Depicting imagined worlds of the whimsical and the absurd, they formed a fantastical backdrop for the objects. The result was a melange of contrasting artforms that balanced the classical with the modern, creating an interesting, serendipitous conversation between the two. Most of the antiques were from the Claire & Francis Heritage Lane Collection, with the oldest, a white pottery bird-shaped cup, dating to the Han dynasty (202BC-220AD). There were other animal-themed vessels in the form of a parrot-shaped stoneware cup from the Northernand Southern dynasties (420-589AD) and two small Yue ware …

Atlas 4013

By Gerhard Bruyns / Cities are constructions. They consist of streets, lanes and alleys. Walls, windows, ceilings and a succession of doorways. Buildings, loose structures, canopies and streets. Trees, shrubs, bushes and garden pockets. In a variety of combinations and orders, the binding together of any of these elements crystallise other formations: spatial complexes and neighbourhoods, articulating cultural burrows and areas of affluence. In its totality it represents a body of material that formulates an urban environment, living and non-living, operating through natural and human processes.  However, for most of us who live in the city, we form an association through our ways of existence, in how we engage with the material world, with the buildings, structures and gardens. We build memories, link important moments to places we have seen, and savour the places we knew while becoming adults. From anthropologist Gregory Bateson’s (1904-80) perspective, this in itself represents specific Steps to an Ecology of Mind (1972), a way of thinking about the world we know and experience. Irrespective of what the actual artefact is or how that object is woven into our existence, our …

Howie Tsui

Parallax Chambers /Art Labor Gallery / Shanghai / Nov 10, 2018 – Jan 8, 2019 / Nooshfar Afnan / As the martial-arts fiction community mourns the recent death of well-known wuxia novelist Jin Yong (1924-2018), it is refreshing to see his characters and stories live on in the works of Vancouver-based artist Howie Tsui. The artist grew up consuming endless hours of old Hong Kong martial-arts movies, including video adaptations of Jin Yong’s books. In retrospect the artist has realised that they were a lifeline to his cultural roots in his birthplace, and still provide a rich source of inspiration.  Tsui’s first solo show at Art Labor in Shanghai follows on the heels of his exhibition opening at Ocat Museum of Contemporary Art, Xi’an. The Xi’an exhibition showcases his giant, 20-metre-long, scroll-like video installation Retainers of Anarchy, originally commissioned by the Vancouver Art Gallery. Set in the fabled and now demolished Kowloon Walled City, it depicts in minute detail the lives of ordinary residents and martial-arts practitioners in the self-ruled community. The show at Art …

Lee Kit

We used to be more sensitive /Hara Museum / Tokyo / Sep 16 – Dec 24, 2018 / John Batten / Lee Kit’s exhibition occupies, as a single installation, the entire Hara Museum of Contemporary Art, an adapted modernist 1930s former residential building surrounded on two sides by a Japanese garden with an open lawn at the rear. Selections from the museum’s permanent contemporary sculpture collection are shown outside, and permanent installations are also displayed within the museum. It is necessary to appreciate the architecture, the architectural detailing – particularly the windows – and the other art and areas of the museum, including the shop and cafe, to fully appreciate Lee’s exhibition.  Rather than ignoring or competing with the museum’s architecture and its installed art, Lee actively embraces the museum, and both strategically and subtly places his own paintings, videos and installations within it. Lee’s entire installation beckons to be quietly looked at, but it also works if viewers quickly pace through the galleries, ideally accompanied by their own (loud) ear-plugged music, passing through the museum’s natural light, shadows and reflections layered by Lee’s added …

Amna Naqvi

Supporter of the arts, collector and philanthropist Amna Naqvi talks about two commissioned pieces in her collection. Untitled is an installation that was commissioned from the Hong Kong-based artist Tsang Kin-Wah in 2012. Both my husband Ali and I’d been noticing Kin-Wah’s work in Hong Kong for some time. For me the appeal lay in his use of text as a leitmotif. We were on an Asia Art Archive Collectors Circle trip to Seoul in 2011 and it proved to be the turning point for this acquisition. We visited Leeum museum in Seoul, came upon Kin-Wah’s text on the glass cladding of the museum, and I was mesmerised by the sheer scale of the installation. We both decided that a commissioned work would be best as we would prefer the possibility of an installation rather than a painting. We invited Kin-Wah home for a discussion with Jehan Chu, who helped us with the commission. We came up with the idea of a folding blue and white chinoiserie-inspired screen which would be manifested as a single work of art but with the …