Author: Artomity Magazine

LeeLee Chan 陳麗同

By Caroline Ha Thuc / Born in 1984 in Hong Kong, LeeLee Chan is well known for sculptural installations that transform discarded mass-produced objects from daily life into hybrid and often organic forms. For Chan, there is no discontinuity between the human, natural and technological spheres; she has developed a holistic approach to the world and to society. Art allows her to connect these realms creatively, opening up new and sometimes surprising perspectives on our urban environment. Caroline Ha Thuc: You left Hong Kong at the age of 17 to study in the United States and you spent 13 years abroad, including two in the UK, before coming back in 2015. How did this journey shape your work?LeeLee Chan: I guess it changed my perspective on Hong Kong and how I now appreciate my family’s heritage. My parents are antique dealers, and I grew up surrounded by Chinese antiques, yet I did not fully appreciate them until I came back. I am also more open to the urban environment I am now living in, in Kwai Chung, and I …

Tai Kwun Contemporary: INK CITY | Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys

Tai Kwun Contemporary: INK CITY | Portals, Stories, and Other JourneysApr 23 to Aug 1, 2021 1/F JC Contemporary & F Hall, Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTue – Sun: 11am – 7pm (Closed on Mondays) Tai Kwun Contemporary has opened two new exhibitions! INK CITY and Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys will be on view from Apr 23 to Aug 1, 2021. INK CITY sets out an expanded vision of ink art firmly grounded in current social, political, and aesthetic concerns, featuring artists inspired by immediate encounters with contemporary life. Often caught between an overwhelming urbanism and intimate brushes with everyday life, the artists offer keen observations, commentaries, and sometimes even deconstructions of contemporary culture and society through their artworks. ArtistsLuis Chan, Chen Shaoxiong, Chu Hing-Wah, Sherry Fung Hoi Shan, Frog King Kwok, Lam Tung Pang, Joey Leung Ka Yin, Li Jin, Wilson Shieh, Sun Xun, Frank Tang Kai Yiu, Tao Aimin, Walasse Ting, Tsang Tsou-Choi (King of Kowloon), Howie Tsui, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Wei Dong, Yang Jiechang, Zhang Yanzi Curated by Katherine Don and Tobias Berger Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys stems from Asia Art Archive’s research …

Rodel Tapaya at Tang Contemporary Art

Random Numbers /Apr 22 – May 15, 2021 /Opening: Apr 22, 6 – 8pm / Tang Contemporary Art10/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road CentralCentral, Hong KongTu-Sa 11am – 7pm tangcontemporary.com Random Numbers is the latest solo exhibition by Filipino contemporary artist Rodel Tapaya at Tang Contemporary Art Hong Kong showcasing the artist’s most recent body of work. Rodel Tapaya is one of the most prominent contemporary Filipino painters working within the international art world today. Early in Tapaya’s career, he came to regional and global prominence through his now signature body of work, the Folk Narrative paintings. During this phase, the artist drew direct inspiration from pre-colonial mythology and Filipino folkloric tradition in order to fuse the otherworldly imagery with the impressions from the contemporary daily life. This enabled him to establish a unique contemporary, neo-traditional artistic form of myth-making. In these works, numerous pictorial fragments within muralist compositions are devoid of traditional perspective, and meticulously pieced together to form epic stories filled with allegorical references. Tapaya became renowned for his celebration of Filipino culture while communicating urgent universal ideas concerning civilization, colonization, capitalism and globalization. In this …

Andrew Luk 陸浩明 & Samuel Swope

By Brady Ng / More than a decade ago, futurists and techno-hobbyists started to pronounce with unalloyed confidence that drones would upend the way we live. Aside from widely publicised use cases for the military, law enforcement and surveillance, the proposition was that they could also provide entertainment through photography or as general playthings, while others could automate tasks for us, like robotic cleaners or all-seeing autonomous security guards that watch over homes from above. As social and cultural developments iterate and unfold, technological advancements that ostensibly make our lives easier come with strings attached. Yet the overarching concern is velocity – prosperity and power await the first to switch zero to one. The cultural theorist and philosopher Paul Virilio described this condition as “dromology”, likening the evolution of society and culture to a race. Hong Kong-based artists Andrew Luk and Samuel Swope have teamed up for a project that unpacks Virillo’s observation. To make their point, the duo built a racetrack for drones in de Sarthe’s gallery space. Luk and Swope sound like architects …

New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90s

New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90sUntil April 24, 2022  Hong Kong Museum of Art (HKMoA)10 Salisbury Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong KongMon – Wed, Fri 10am – 6pmSat, Sun, Public holidays 10am – 7pm The development of Hong Kong art reached a critical juncture in the 1980s and 1990s. Numerous young artists, having graduated in Hong Kong or returned to the city after studying aboard, dedicated themselves to exploring new artistic forms and expressions through their creations. This enabled the rise of installation art, new media, contemporary photography, etc., and brought vibrancy to art creation in Hong Kong. The New Horizons: Ways of Seeing Hong Kong Art in the 80s and 90s exhibition being held at the Hong Kong Museum of Art (HKMoA) examines the new trends and breakthroughs in contemporary art in Hong Kong during the era.  With a two-year project of interviews, research and consolidation, the HKMoA worked closely with guest curator Janet Fong and her team, and invites visitors to look at the breakthroughs and accomplishments of Hong Kong artists …

Dai Fujiwara The Road of My Cyber Physical Hands at HKDI Gallery

Until March 28, 2021 (Closed on Tuesdays) / Hong Kong Design Institute & Hong Kong Institute of Vocational Education / (Lee Wai Lee), 3 King Ling Rd, Tseung Kwan O, NT /  新界將軍澳景嶺路3號香港知專設計學院HKDI Gallery Registration required: https://hkdigallery_daifujiwara_admission.eventbrite.com  HKDI Gallery is honoured to stage the exhibition Dai Fujiwara The Road of My Cyber Physical Hands, the renowned Japanese designer Dai Fujiwara’s first solo exhibition in Hong Kong, co-organised with DAIFUJIWARA AND COMPANY. Bringing creativity to textiles, product design and beyond, Dai Fujiwara is a designer who continues to transcend creative borders. This exhibition features a first ever look into his earliest works from his time as a design student, tracing the road he has travelled through to his most recent creations. The exhibition at HKDI Gallery is a conversation between the present and the future, capturing Fujiwara’s journey through different realms, from nature and technology to design, art, community and society; and travels through the past, present and future, blurring the borders of each. 

A cross-media live performance – In Sync: Music in Motion

In Sync: Music in Motion /Mar 20 – 21 Saturday – Sunday /Freespace, Art Park, West Kowloon Cultural District (MTR Kowloon Station Exit E)$180 (No handling fee) Hong Kong music and video artists join forces to present a cross-media live performance. Musicians including Olivier Cong, Fung Lam, Mike Yip, Narbi, Bowen Li and the newly-formed Freespace Ensemble perform various genre-defying music. Simultaneously, video artists exhibit visually stunning short films in the background, creating an innovative audio-visual experience. Buy tickets now. The programme is a celebration of rearrangements, featuring a revamped version of Olivier Cong’s spellbinding The Interpretation of Milou’s Dream with Linus Chan’s video. The audio-visual piece tells an introspective story and brings solace after an isolating year. The Freespace Ensemble, a new group-in-residence at Freespace, will make their debut by playing Fung Lam’s rearranged pieces, including Reminiscence (taken from Hong Kong Episodes), under the backdrop of the visual works by Jess Lau Ching-wa and Anthony Lai. Mike Yip will collaborate with Narbi and Bowen Li to twine their compositions around the films by Prescott Law Ho-pui and Wong …

Reopening: Francis Alÿs and Mika Rottenberg at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tai Kwun Contemporary has reopened on March 4! / Wet feet __ dry feet: borders and gamesSolo exhibition by Francis AlÿsCurators: Xue Tan, Sunjung KimCo-presented with Art Sonje SeoulNow till March 28 SNEEZESolo exhibition by Mika RottenbergCurator: Tobias BergerPresenter: Tai Kwun ContemporaryNow till March 31 Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong 10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTuesday to Sunday, 11am – 7pm 𝘞𝘦𝘵 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵 __ 𝘥𝘳𝘺 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵: 𝘣𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘨𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘴 gathers for the first time in Hong Kong important recent works by Francis Alÿs, one of the most influential conceptual artists of our time. Presented on the 1/F, the exhibition is structured around the artist’s interests in migration and borders, and his fascination with children’s games from around the world. This solo exhibition highlights his poetic, imaginative sensibility, anchored by geopolitical concerns and individual will while being grounded in everyday life.⁠ We are excited to welcome all visitors again with the debut presentation of Francis Alÿs’s two newly commissioned videos that he specially created in Hong Kong for Tai Kwun Contemporary. Mika Rottenberg’s 𝙎𝙉𝙀𝙀𝙕𝙀 also continues on the 3/F gallery, presenting immersive video installations about surreal alternative worlds of global everyday …

Ng Tsz-kwan 吳子昆

A multimedia artist and designer, Ng Tsz-kwan (b.1972) proposes various and reflexive modes of artistic experience based on a poetics of language that unfolds at the borderline of performance. Ng graduated from The Chinese University of Hong Kong in 1997 with a bachelor’s degree in fine arts, and later earned his master’s at Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design in London. In 2006, he co-founded multimedia design company Yucolab. His artistic practice draws from these experiences yet also departs from them. It mainly develops in two experimental directions: immersive, multisensory installations and space-oriented installations based on decontextualised, fragmented moving images. For Ng, “What we see is how we see”. His installations often question and explore the medium of the cinema and the relationships that the audience entertains with moving images in order to open up the space between them. Recently, he created an automated mobile chair that travels along a railway track within the exhibition space, a way for viewers to encounter his works while in motion, on a journey he controls. He disengages from narratives and linear …