All posts tagged: Huang Yongping

Huang Yongping, Shen Yuan

Hong Kong Foot  Tang Contemporary Art Hong Kong Dec 20, 2017 – Jan 27 Katherine Volk Huang Yongping and Shen Yuan don’t avoid provocative subjects, and their work often creates controversy. Late last year, for example, Huang’s work was topical when his piece Theatre of the World, featuring lizards consuming insects as a metaphor for human violence, helped provide the title of the exhibition Art and China after 1989: Theatre of the World at New York’s Solomon R Guggenheim Museum. After arguments between animal cruelty activists and proponents of artistic freedom, his work was ultimately pulled from the show. Neither did the pair shy away from contemporary discourse in the four works they made specifically for the opening of Tang Contemporary Art’s new space at H Queens. The title, Hong Kong Foot, refers to the fungal infection more often known as athlete’s foot, which was historically a common local condition among settlers, missionaries, soldiers and refugees. As Huang says, it has now been redefined as the way Hong Kong infects those who come to the city with its characteristics. Central to the exhibition was Huang’s …

Tang Contemporary Art Hong Kong

Grand Opening Huang Yongping & Shen Yuan – “Hong Kong Foot” Dec 20, 2017 – Jan 27, 2018 Hong Kong New Space: 10/F, H Queen’s, 80 Queen’s Road Central, Hong Kong Opening Reception: Wednesday, December 20, 2017, 6 – 8 pm Tang Contemporary Art is proud to announce a new exhibition for Huang Yongping and Shen Yuan, entitled “Hong Kong Foot,” which will be shown from December 20, 2017 to January 27, 2018 at Tang Contemporary Art’s new tenth-floor space in H Queen’s.   This exhibition will present three new works by Huang Yongping — Les Consoles de Jeu Souveraines, H.K/La Peau de Chagrin, and Wax Seal — as well as Shen Yuan’s Yellow Umbrella/Parasol. The works exhibited have no direct relationship to the title, but the title does reflect the artists’ interest in Hong Kong’s regional politics. “Hong Kong foot” is the Chinese colloquial name for a fungal infection of the foot, because early Western missionaries noted that many people in Hong Kong had this condition. When Hong Kong was ceded to the British, many British soldiers also contracted this infection. Even …