All posts tagged: Morgan Wong

Chen Tianzhuo, Chen Wei, Double Fly Art Center, Hu Weiyi, Lu Yang, Sun Xun, Carla Chan, Chris Cheung, Tang Kwok-hin, Morgan Wong

#You #Me #OurSELFIES  Hong Kong Visual Arts Centre Hong Kong Jan 6 – 22, 2018 Valencia Tong The hashtag has changed the way we communicate in the digital age. In the exhibition One World Exposition 2.2: #YOU#ME#ourSELFIES at Hong Kong Visual Arts Centre, artists from mainland China and Hong Kong born in the 1980s and 90s show us how the language of technology, the internet and social media infiltrates the aesthetics of art. The title suggests a radical change in how art is experienced, especially by the millennial generation. Gone are the days when security guards in museums yelled “No photos”; instead, audience members are now encouraged to document their participation and interaction with the art works by generating content themselves, usually in the form of a selfie on social media, democratising the consumption of art across time and space. The exhibition showcases how media art can engage with contemporary issues through a selection of multidisciplinary works. Hu Weiyi’s The Raver compares our consumption and production of information to being strapped to electric chairs used during executions. We are forced to react incoherently to the bombardment of images, sounds and …

Sculpture Parks and Street Art: Curating Hong Kong’s Public Art Agenda

By Aaina Bhargava Hong Kong, renowned for its booming art market, is widely regarded as Asia’s art hub. While commercial success has unquestionably been essential in validating this rising status, so has been the provision of proper education and exposure of the public to a diverse range of artistic practices. To fulfil its potential as an art capital, Hong Kong needs more of the latter. There are still sectors of the art community that are severely under-represented, from local art initiatives to experimental art spaces and, in particular, public-art projects. Public-art programmes are vital to cultural development in cities, due to the easy accessibility to art they provide. Hong Kong has suffered from a lack of quality programmes, but two recent initiatives seek to change this. One is Hong Kong’s first sculpture park, and the other is the formation of HKwalls, a non-profit organisation facilitating street-art projects citywide. Harbour Arts Sculpture Park opened in late February, altering an iconic space on the harbour front between Central and Wan Chai. Co-curators Tim Marlow and Fumio Nanjo have emphasised the significance of the park in …

Art in the Bar, 14 September, 6 pm

Locations Cobo House  I  Duddell’s  I  Halcyon  I  Ping Pong  I  Potato Head  I  Runway  I  Salon 10  I  Shore I  Tartine I  The Pawn     Artists Adrian Wong (Hong Kong) I  Melati Suryodarmo (Indonesia) I  Chen Tianzhuo (China) I  Morgan Wong (Hong Kong) I  Chim↑Pom (Japan) I  Rabbya Naseer and Hurmat Ul Ain (Pakistan) I  Come Inside (Hong Kong) I  Samson Young (Hong Kong) I  Deng Dafei (China) I  Tao Hui (China) I  Erkka Nissinen (Hong Kong based) I  The Utopia Group (China) I  Hu Weiyi (China) I  Tromarama (Indonesia) I  Korakrit Arunanondchai (Thailand) I  Wong Ping (Hong Kong) I  Li Ming (China) I  Xu Qu (China) About Asian video art will take over Hong Kong’s hottest bars for one night only this September when CoBo Social, Asia’s first online and offline art community platform, presents Art in the Bar. On 14 September (Thursday) from 6pm onwards, Art in the Bar will take place across 11 of the city’s hottest bars, who will team up with CoBo Social to offer special promotions, performances and screenings of cutting-edge video art. Art in the Bar aims to introduce the best of Asian video art to diverse audiences by bringing art directly to the community. The …

Morgan Wong

An in-depth but casual conversation between Hong Kong artist Morgan Wong and art writer Caroline Ha Thuc   Caroline Ha Thuc: From the beginning of your career time has been at the core of your practice: how to visualise it, how to grasp it and even recently how to smell it. Where does this obsession come from? Morgan Wong: I have no clear-cut notion of when and where this obsession or interest came from. I always see my work Plus-Minus-Zero (2010) as one of my fundamental encounters with the subject of temporality. However, there are always threads connecting previous and future works, like Journey – Hong Kong (2007) and I Got Time (2013), and I think it is important that some traces stay hidden so that connections appear at the right moment, instead of everything being too logical in the first place. My latest project, KIGOJA Standard Time (KST) (2016), in which I deal with time zones as immaterial borders, could be seen as revisiting time difference as a subject, but it also connects with …