All posts tagged: White Cube

Bruce Nauman 布魯斯·瑙曼

By Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand / This year marks the 80th birthday of American artist Bruce Nauman. Following on from a recent Tate retrospective is Presence/Absence at White Cube, the first exhibition in Hong Kong for the pioneering video artist, featuring five works: two single-channel pieces, from 1999 and 2001; and three dual-screen projections made in 2013. The artist is present in all but one of them. Many of Nauman’s earlier works are about time and endurance: his own as an artist, as he pushes himself to physical limits; and the audience’s, as they try to sit through videos of maniacal clowns (Clown Torture, 1987), and of the artist performing mundane tasks. In one of several early videos from 1968, we see him bouncing off the wall (Bouncing in the Corner I), making the viewer dizzy in the process. In another, Walk with Contrapposto (1968), he walks back and forth in a narrow corridor, exaggeratedly swinging his hips side to side. Similarly, in Walking in an Exaggerated Manner Around the Perimeter of a Square (1968), he …

Takis at White Cube Hong Kong

Takis /Nov 21 – Feb 27 / White Cube Hong Kong /1/F, 50 Connaught Road, Central /Tuesday – Saturday, 11am – 7pm / White Cube Hong Kong is pleased to present an exhibition of works by the late Greek artist Takis (1925–2019). This first presentation in Asia follows his last major solo exhibition as a living artist at the Tate Modern. Featuring sculptures drawn from a thirty-year period – from the end of the 1960s to the 1990s – it showcases the artist’s committed exploration of art and science.  Born in Athens, Takis took art into realms that were previously considered the domain of physicists and engineers. Describing himself as an ‘instinctive scientist’, Takis carved out a new aesthetic territory, incorporating invisible forms of energy such as magnetic, acoustic or light waves as the fourth dimension of his work. View full exhibition details online.

Virginia Overton 弗吉尼亞·奧弗頓

Signs of the Times / By Christina Ko / When you are dealing with works as large and savagely stark as Virginia Overton’s installations, it’s easy to reduce the importance of a scattering of pieces on paper, which might initially seem to be simply two-dimensional precursors or stylistic explorations that precede their sculptural siblings, forged of aluminium and light. To many artists, paper is usually just a canvas, its function no more than to support the paint that sits on top of it; to Overton, it is a material with a history and significance equal to that of the salvaged aluminium that forms the rest of the pieces. Overton’s practice is not defined by any overarching message or cause, and, by her own admission, defying categorisation can be “problematic” in a world that loves a pigeonhole. But if there is a connective thread, it is that she works exclusively with salvaged materials, and that respecting the past life of said materials is an important aspect of the process – whether they be her go-to industrial …

Virginia Overton at White Cube Hong Kong

Alone in the Wilderness  Sep 11 – Nov 14, 2020 White Cube1/F, 50 Connaught Road CentralHong Kong In her first solo exhibition in Asia, Virginia Overton presents new sculptures and works on paper. In this body of work the artist explores the histories embedded in certain materials, and the narratives and value systems that are created when these materials are appropriated, revived and re-contextualized. Overton’s sculptures are made from objects and elements she comes across in her immediate environment, her choices and working process driven by what she has described as the ‘natural push and pull in materials’. She selects materials that are part ready-mades, altering their purpose and function through a shift in perspective or orientation. As with so much of her work, the materials used in this exhibition have had other lives before taking on a life as artwork.  For this new series of sculptures Overton has reassembled aluminium letters and logos salvaged from the names and signs adorning the facades of high-rise corporate buildings. Shown alongside the sculptures are a new series of …

Park Seo-Bo

Ecriture 1967−1976 / White Cube / Hong Kong / Nov 23, 2018 – Jan 5, 2019 / Valencia Tong / The father of the Korean Dansaekhwa movement, Park Seo-Bo believes that art is an act of emptying. Through repeated hand movements he creates meditative works that are deeply rooted in Taoist and Buddhist philosophy. At his exhibition at White Cube in Hong Kong, the early works of the artist’s Ecriture series, which began in the late 1960s, embody the notion of emptying the mind. The Korean War in the 50s was a traumatic period for many local artists, whose works became more introspective following the unrest in the country. In the next decade, the post-war generation of artists embarked on the spiritual journey of Dansaekhwa, the Korean monochrome movement, with an emphasis on the process of art-making. Park’s work explores existential conditions but is firmly rooted in the Korean cultural tradition. He regards the resulting art pieces that we see as the residue of the process of his spiritual exercise, as if he had been chanting prayers …

Wang Gongxin

Sep 6 – Nov 11 The gallery is pleased to present Rotation, a solo exhibition by Chinese multimedia artist Wang Gongxin – his first in Hong Kong. This is the first presentation of the artist’s early installation works, as well as new works. The exhibition presents artworks from the period immediately preceding Wang’s first uses of video and projection in 1996. Most of the exhibited works were originally conceived of or created between 1993 and 1996, a period of fervent artistic experimentation inseparable from Wang’s later video practice. Born in 1960 in Beijing, Wang is a pioneering media artist, being one of the first in China to use digital editing. He was also, in 2001, the founder of Loft, the earliest media art centre in China. Wang began his career as a painter, but his experiences and in particular the art education he received in the US between the late 1980s and early 1990s encouraged him to broaden his artistic language, evidence of the energy and vitality within his practice. White Cube 50 Connaught Road, Central …

Rachel Kneebone

Ovid in Exile By Diana d’Arenberg Parmanand British sculptor Rachel Kneebone forges the human condition out of clay. The great meta-narratives of humanity – creation and destruction, life and death, renewal, love, suffering, heaven and hell, the limitations and possibilities of the human body – are all tackled in her sculptures. It is a biblical, monumental endeavour. Aptly named, Kneebone creates architectural structures of white porcelain resembling towers or sculpture-like crypts of small bones, or tangles of roots or vines. The violent entanglement of limbs might be ripped straight out of Dante’s Inferno. She turned porcelain – a material associated with the decorative figurines and tea sets of the bourgeoisie – into the boundary-defying installation 399 Days at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London this year. The colossal sculpture, her largest to date, is a towering, epic explosion of limbs, flowers, spheres and genitalia. Fragments of the human body are intertwined, clambering and cascading down. They recall Rodin’s The Gates of Hell – her work was exhibited alongside the artist’s in 2012 at the Brooklyn Museum – or an erotic Tower of Babel, …

Rachel Kneebone

May 27 – Aug 19 Opening: Friday, May 26, 6 – 8pm Kneebone’s work is concerned with the human condition, using porcelain to expose what has been described as the ‘sublime echoes of life’s cycle from emergence and ecstasy to mourning and loss.’ Having developed a complex and highly personal sculptural language that references both classicism and surrealism, she combines intricately modelled organic, architectural and geometric forms to create detailed scenarios that constantly shift between figuration and abstraction. In this new series of work, Kneebone draws and expands on themes from the poems of Ovid, exploring in particular ideas of evolution and desire, between the actual and the metaphorical, the real and the imagined and natural and modelled forms. Flowers, tendrils, body parts, spheres and more abstract elements are amassed and built up, appearing to merge and multiply, as if in a state of continuous flux or struggle.   White Cube 50 Connaught Road, Central (852) 2592 2000 Email Web Tu-Sa 11am to 7pm The first of White Cube’s galleries to be located outside of the …