All posts tagged: Ho Sin Tung

Yuk King Tan and Tobias Berger

Artist Yuk King Tan and her husband, head of art at Tai Kwun Tobias Berger, talk about three of their favourite pieces in their collection. All of the art work we have tells stories about countries that we live in, our friends and our shared history. Some of the work makes the audience reconsider its belief structures, opening up different ways of contemplating the world. Art is such a unique and challenging form of communication. It’s important to have pieces that inform the way we work and also shift how we perceive our surroundings and community. Three really interesting, intelligent artists in Hong Kong right now are Ho Sin Tung, Nadim Abbas and Leung Chi Wo. Ho Sin Tung has a lyrical, idiosyncratic illustrative style that uses a sociological perspective to examine the way memory, aesthetics, literature and filmscapes can create and mythologise a changing territory like Hong Kong. Her drawing style, with maps and seating plans, uses a muted colour palette and distorted viewpoints to make work that is suggestive, beautiful and often quietly subversive. Your Name is Ferdinand (2010) is a delicate pencil and …

Ho Sin Tung

Dusty Landscape Chambers Fine Art, Beijing, Sep 17 – Nov 20, 2016 By Nooshfar Afnan Visitors entering Ho Sin Tung’s exhibition at Chambers Fine Art in Beijing are confronted with posters like those hung outside Hong Kong cinemas. For the Hong Kong artist’s first solo show in mainland China, she has chosen two types of custom-made frames in a variety of colours to hold these posters and emphasise the idea that they advertise movies. On closer inspection, however, the posters, executed with coloured pencil on tea-stained paper, are revealed to promote fictional movies, mainly horror. For example When the Triangle Descends the Stairs (2016) pays homage to Hitchcock’s Psycho, including its famous shower scene, the large house and its stairwell. With her dry sense of humour, Ho replaces the murderer with a geometric form, a triangle, raising the question of fear of the unknown. “A horror film always reaches its climax and ending at the moment when the unknown reveals itself,” she says. “But what if a triangle descends the stairs? The unknown and the known will arrive at the …