All posts tagged: Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tino Sehgal at Tai Kwun Contemporary’s trust & confusion

trust & confusion / Tino Sehgal / Oct 23 to Dec 5, 2021Tuesday – Sunday,  11am – 7pm 3/F, JC Contemporary and the Prison Yard, Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong Kong http://www.taikwun.hk A new episode of trust & confusion presents two significant works by the critically acclaimed artist Tino Sehgal: These Associations, on the Prison Yard of Tai Kwun, and This Variation, on the 3/F Tai Kwun Contemporary gallery. One of the most important artists in recent decades, the work of Tino Sehgal (b. 1976, UK; lives in Berlin) unfolds not by way of the object but by ephemeral constructed situations. Redefining the museum as a place for social relations, Sehgal radically eliminates the conventional art object, shifting the focus to live interconnections—compositions of voices, choreographies, and people, without involving or generating any physical materials. Marked by his training in political economy and dance, Sehgal’s live works consist of language, conversations, games, movements, and choreographies, poignantly reflecting on the ways society today takes and is given shape. Like no other, Sehgal rearticulates art spaces as a ritualistic environment of social interactions. Visitors …

Poetic Heritage at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Poetic Heritage /Alfredo & Isabel Aquilizan, Ursula Biemann & Paulo Tavares, Leelee Chan, Leung Mee-ping, Jorge Otero-Pailos, Wan Lai-kuen Annie Sep 2 to Nov 21, 2021Tuesday – Sunday,  11am – 7pm JC Contemporary, Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong Kong http://www.taikwun.hk Poetic Heritage explores the critical and creative relationships between heritage and contemporary art through the works of six artists/artist groups from Hong Kong and beyond. Each of the artists offers insight on the many ways that “heritage” provides a productive lens to engage with contemporary issues, while expanding on the notion of “heritage” itself. In doing so, the exhibition also considers how much power and agency individuals have in determining what is retained and reimagined of our heritage. Poetic Heritage looks at how discarded objects could be considered “heritage”. Rather than focusing on rare or expensive materials, some of the artists choose to salvage objects that are regarded as neglectable or negligible, prompting discussion about what differentiates art, heritage, and debris—and what is worth preserving. One of the overseas artists in the exhibition, Jorge Otero-Pailos, has suggested that “experimental …

trust & confusion at Tai Kwun Contemporary

trust & confusion /May 5 to Dec 5, 2021 / 3/F JC Contemporary, Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTue – Sun: 11am – 7pm (Closed on Mondays) http://www.taikwun.hk/en/programmewww.trusting.hk trust & confusion is about the conversation of certainty and chance; the transformative power of bodies, intangibles, and ephemeral encounters; music and magic; and the luck of being alive, with all the concerns that come with it. Evolving, accumulating, the exhibition unfolds over several episodes, on site and online, from now to the end of the year. trust & confusion transforms the white cube space into a fluctuating environment that hosts activities and sensations; it transforms this space in favour of movements, interactions, and deep listening for ears and bodies. There are several visible performances taking place as you enter, and several invisible ones, mostly new commissions from an intergenerational, international, and cosmopolitan group of artists. The exhibition is an invitation to observe how things emerge in relation to each other—sounds, gestures, smells—and to be a part of it, being surprised and giving attention to your inner landscape while a …

Tai Kwun Contemporary: INK CITY | Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys

Tai Kwun Contemporary: INK CITY | Portals, Stories, and Other JourneysApr 23 to Aug 1, 2021 1/F JC Contemporary & F Hall, Tai Kwun10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTue – Sun: 11am – 7pm (Closed on Mondays) Tai Kwun Contemporary has opened two new exhibitions! INK CITY and Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys will be on view from Apr 23 to Aug 1, 2021. INK CITY sets out an expanded vision of ink art firmly grounded in current social, political, and aesthetic concerns, featuring artists inspired by immediate encounters with contemporary life. Often caught between an overwhelming urbanism and intimate brushes with everyday life, the artists offer keen observations, commentaries, and sometimes even deconstructions of contemporary culture and society through their artworks. ArtistsLuis Chan, Chen Shaoxiong, Chu Hing-Wah, Sherry Fung Hoi Shan, Frog King Kwok, Lam Tung Pang, Joey Leung Ka Yin, Li Jin, Wilson Shieh, Sun Xun, Frank Tang Kai Yiu, Tao Aimin, Walasse Ting, Tsang Tsou-Choi (King of Kowloon), Howie Tsui, Evelyn Taocheng Wang, Wei Dong, Yang Jiechang, Zhang Yanzi Curated by Katherine Don and Tobias Berger Portals, Stories, and Other Journeys stems from Asia Art Archive’s research …

Reopening: Francis Alÿs and Mika Rottenberg at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tai Kwun Contemporary has reopened on March 4! / Wet feet __ dry feet: borders and gamesSolo exhibition by Francis AlÿsCurators: Xue Tan, Sunjung KimCo-presented with Art Sonje SeoulNow till March 28 SNEEZESolo exhibition by Mika RottenbergCurator: Tobias BergerPresenter: Tai Kwun ContemporaryNow till March 31 Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong 10 Hollywood Road Central, Hong KongTuesday to Sunday, 11am – 7pm 𝘞𝘦𝘵 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵 __ 𝘥𝘳𝘺 𝘧𝘦𝘦𝘵: 𝘣𝘰𝘳𝘥𝘦𝘳𝘴 𝘢𝘯𝘥 𝘨𝘢𝘮𝘦𝘴 gathers for the first time in Hong Kong important recent works by Francis Alÿs, one of the most influential conceptual artists of our time. Presented on the 1/F, the exhibition is structured around the artist’s interests in migration and borders, and his fascination with children’s games from around the world. This solo exhibition highlights his poetic, imaginative sensibility, anchored by geopolitical concerns and individual will while being grounded in everyday life.⁠ We are excited to welcome all visitors again with the debut presentation of Francis Alÿs’s two newly commissioned videos that he specially created in Hong Kong for Tai Kwun Contemporary. Mika Rottenberg’s 𝙎𝙉𝙀𝙀𝙕𝙀 also continues on the 3/F gallery, presenting immersive video installations about surreal alternative worlds of global everyday …

Francis Alÿs and Mika Rottenberg at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Now till February 2021 / Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong / 10 Hollywood Road / Central, Hong Kong /Tuesday to Sunday, 11am – 7pm / Wet feet __ dry feet: borders and gamesSolo exhibition by Francis AlÿsCurators: Xue Tan, Sunjung KimCo-presented with Art Sonje Seoul Wet feet __ dry feet: borders and games gathers for the first time in Hong Kong important recent works by Francis Alÿs, one of the most influential conceptual artists of our time. Structured around the artist’s interest in migration, borders, and his fascination with children’s games from around the world, this solo exhibition highlights Francis Alÿs’s poetic, imaginative sensibility, anchored by geopolitical concerns and individual will while being grounded in everyday life. The title of the exhibition was the spark to Alÿs’s works in this exhibition: “Wet Feet, Dry Feet” refers to the US policy on Cuban refugees in 1995. Under this policy, Cuban migrants headed for the United States faced vastly different treatment depending on whether they were intercepted at sea or on land, on US soil. If intercepted at sea (“wet feet”), …

Tap Chan, Thea Djordjadze, Jason Dodge, Eisa Jocson, Pratchaya Phinthong

My Body Holds Its Shape / Tai Kwun Contemporary / Hong Kong / May 25 – Sep 27, 2020 / Jacqueline Leung / Little Mermaid Ariel’s song preceded the exhibition hall. By the time the dancer was seen, he had already turned on all fours, stretching his limbs with feline grace. In Eisa Jocson’s Zoo (2020), performance is in a constant state of becoming. Working with the expanse of the room, the dancers shifted between routine and improvised imitations of characters and animals, enlivening a space made to confine – previously as a women’s prison, now as a four-walled enclosure for art. Loosely organised around metaphorical interpretations of the body, such as its existence as a physical container, or as a mental framework of the self, My Body Holds Its Shape questions our efforts to sustain these edifices structuring our understanding of the world. Through the work of five artists, the exhibition opens up these limits as interstices of new relations and significance, creating, according to the opening statement, a “view that was not there …

Online conversations with Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong  8 Aug, 6 pm 15 Aug, 7 pm Eisa Jocson, Akira Takayama, Kohei Sekigawa Tai Kwun Contemporary is launching an online series of tours and conversations, in addition to our VR 360° virtual gallery. On select Wednesdays and Saturdays in August, we will be live-streaming tours of our current exhibitions, along with conversations between curators and artists. This hopefully highlights the enduring power of art in connecting people and communities, and sustains an inquisitive attitude towards our world at this challenging time. Find out more about the online programmes for They Do Understand Each Other and My Body Holds Its Shape. Conversations: Saturday, 8 Aug 2020, 6 – 7.15 pm Hong Kong time“Trust in the Public: Akira Takayama and Kohei Sekigawa in conversation with Yuka Uematsu” (Japanese with closed captioning in English) Yuka Uematsu, curator at The National Museum of Art, Osaka and co-curator of They Do Not Understand Each Other at Tai Kwun Contemporary will engage Akira Takayama and Kohei Sekigawa in a conversation on performative actions by people often unseen in society, activating the democratic potential of commercial spaces …

They Do Not Understand Each Other at Tai Kwun Contemporary

Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong /  May 25 – Sep 13, 2020 / Saori Akutagawa (Madokoro), Jennifer Allora & Guillermo Calzadilla, Agnes Arellano, chi too, Heman Chong, Chua Chye Teck, Ho Tzu Nyen, Sojung Jun, Tsubasa Kato, Charles Lim, Kumi Machida, Jun Nguyen-Hatsushiba, Wit Pimkanchanapong, Kohei Sekigawa, Kazuo Shiraga, Akira Takayama, Than Sok, Ming Wong JC Contemporary, Tai Kwun, 10 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong Mon 2 – 8pmTue – Sun 11am–8pm Two figures are seen performing a simple task together on a small island, while not comprehending a word uttered by the other. The setting for this artwork by Tsubasa Kato, from which the exhibition draws its title, is the Tsushima islands that lie halfway between the Korean peninsula and the Japanese archipelago. The success of the artist and his Korean collaborator in this act of cooperation appears to have been achieved, if not by virtue of their good humour and patience with each other, then by an understanding that exceeds the plane of language. The exhibition They Do Not Understand Each Other brings into dialogue commissions and artworks from …

Phantom Plane, Cyberpunk in the Year of the Future

Tai Kwun Contemporary, Hong Kong  Oct 5, 2019 – Jan 4, 2020 Nadim Abbas, Bettina von Arnim, Chan Wai Kwong, Chen Wei, Cui Jie, Aria Dean, Ho Rui An, Tishan Hsu, Tetsuya Ishida, JODI, Lee Bul, Seiko Mikami, Takehiko Nakafuji, Shinro Ohtake, Yuri Pattison, Sondra Perry, Seth Price, Jon Rafman, Hiroki Tsukuda, Nurrachmat Widyasena, Zheng Mahler From its outset, cyberpunk depicted radical technological advances—plugged-in consciousness, androids indistinguishable from people—but also worlds divided by unequal access to wealth and resources, where multinational corporations, sovereign states, hackers, and criminal underworld enterprises all manoeuvre for control. Far from having become outdated, cyberpunk’s dystopian scenes—its protagonists, networked and yet isolated, navigating neo-noir city streets illuminated by the glare of commerce—look like an average night on the town in 2019, whether in Hong Kong, Los Angeles, Jakarta or New York. Like so much that was once seen as “cyber” or virtual—as outside of us, a separate and distinct terrain to be explored or conquered—the realms of cyberpunk have begun to seem less like an otherworldly plane, and more of a funhouse mirror of our world, lives, …