All posts tagged: Arthur Hacker

Sudhee Liao dances to Arthur Hacker at Ping Pong Gintonería

Sudhee Liao /Dance Performances /May 25 & 26, 2022 /9.30pm /Free entry / Ping Pong Gintonería129, L/G Second Street  Nam Cheong HouseSai Ying Pun, Hong Kong pingpong129.com @pingpong129 sudheeliao.com @dancingwithenigmaticperception Ping Pong Gintonería is pleased to present dance performances by Sudhee Liao. The performances are inspired by the works of Arthur Hacker currently on show at Ping Pong Gintonería and accompanied by music sampled from 70s Hong Kong.  Sudhee Liao, is an interdisciplinary choreographer and movement artist who has collaborated extensively with choreographers and other performance artists in international dance and art festivals. This is her third collaboration with Ping Pong. The performances are part of the Art Basel Hong Kong 2022’s VIP programme.

Solo Exhibition of Arthur Hacker and Performances by Sudhee Liao at Ping Pong Gintonería  

Arthur Hacker / Exhibtion: May 12 – Jul 10, 2022 / Tue – Sun: 6pm – 10pm / Sudhee Liao / Performances: May 25 & 26, 2022 / 9.30pm Ping Pong Gintonería129, L/G Second Street  Nam Cheong HouseSai Ying Pun, Hong Kong pingpong129.com@pingpong129 Free entry Ping Pong Gintonería is pleased to present an exhibition of works by Arthur Hacker and accompanying dance performances by Sudhee Liao.  This exhibition consists of works made throughout Arthur Hacker‘s career, from album covers designed in 1960s London to original drawings up to the early 2000s. Also on show are his works for the government, including stamps, posters and the famed Lap Sap Chung, as well as books, illustrations, original prints and drawings from his later freelance career.` After studying at the Royal College of Art and a spell working in London, Hacker was appointed art director of the Hong Kong Government’s Information Services Department in 1967.  In the 1970s he created the iconic figure of Lap Sap Chung for the Urban Council’s Clean Hong Kong Campaign.  He published his first book, Hacker’s Hong Kong, and eventually left …

Octavia Fox

Food historian Octavia Fox talks about three of her favourite pieces in her collection. Antonio Casadei was an Italian artist working in Hong Kong during the 60s and 70s. His name is now little known but you would have walked past his work on numerous occasions: the ceramic screens in Statue Square are his, as are the back-lit glass wall in the lobby of the St George’s Building and the public sculptures in Mei Foo Sun Chuen. I think he was a great ceramicist and he must have had a substantial kiln somewhere in Hong Kong to produce works like the chunky bas reliefs which once graced the lobbies of the Prince’s Building. I have two of his paintings, which my father bought when Casadei was selling art door to door – most probably on his arrival in 1962. These paintings must have been produced in Italy before his arrival but they are, for me, very much a part of that era in Hong Kong. Eizō Katō was a Japanese landscape artist who worked in both Hong Kong and Japan. …

Crossing Hong Kong’s Harbour

The very first art objects mass-exported from China to buyers in Europe, Asia and the Ottoman Empire were designed-to-order, ceramic and porcelain chinoiserie items, often purely utilitarian: crockery dinner sets, jars and storage urns. In the 18th century worldwide trade expanded due to growing demand, sturdier ships and established trading routes. Canton, as Guangzhou was then known, was China’s only port open for foreign trade, and encouraged by the success of the porcelain trade the earliest China Trade paintings were created there. This established the practice for visiting European traders and military personnel to buy or commission a painting as a souvenir of their visit or an export product. Executed by Chinese artisan painters, China Trade paintings were completed in a western landscape painting style, often naive and using rudimentary perspective. The paintings focused on depicting Canton life, including factories, trading houses, foreign diplomatic quarters, landscape scenes and visiting ships – subjects that appealed to Europeans. The monopoly on British trade with India and China held by the British East India Company for more than two centuries ended in 1834. Direct British …