All posts tagged: Blindspot Gallery

Leung Chi Wo

By Caroline Ha Thuc there and thenness “Is History not simply that time when we were not born?” asks Roland Barthes, while looking at a photograph of his mother as a child, in his book Camera Lucida. Leung Chi Wo’s process is all too Barthesian: born in 1968, he focuses here on 1967, the year when the most violent riots in the post-Second World War history of Hong Kong took place. In the womb of his mother, the artist could not witness those events, and to recollect today occurrences that are lost forever, he can only rely on archives, found objects and stories. This exhibition could be perceived as a personal museum, another version of the Museum of the Lost project he and Sara Wong began in 2013, but one dedicated to 1967, a year he was not around but tries to reach for – despite the effects of time and subjectivity – through the power of photography and the socially constructed memory of the past. Fraser (2015) epitomises the artist’s practice and concerns. The installation features …

Angela Su

The Afterlife of Rosy Leavers Blindspot Gallery May 20 –  Jun 30, 2017 John Batten Among the first people to experiment with electronic synthesisers in the early 1970s were British band Curved Air. Their music captured the heady atmosphere of the era, while the cover of their 1972 album Phantasmagoria, drawn by prominent illustrator John Gorham, featured a long, curly title running from edge to edge, with a hooded figure in the background smoking a hookah. The album’s title was inspired by Lewis Carroll’s poem Phantasmagoria, meaning a fantastic sequence of haphazardly associative imagery. Carroll’s poem – the longest he ever wrote – is a comical, nonsensical conversation between a ghost and a Mr Tibbett. The ghost arrives intending to take up residence in Mr Tibbett’s home, but after a series of conversations and explanations of why he is there, eventually realises that he is at the wrong address; he should be at a Mr Tibb’s home. The poem reflects the Victorian era’s interest in the supernatural, the world of psychics and mediums who employed …

Eason Tsang

Powerless  Blindspot Gallery, Hong Kong, Jul 9 – Aug 27, 2016 By Caroline Ha Thuc For his first solo show in Hong Kong, Eason Tsang Ka Wai continues and deepens his exploration of cityscapes and local architecture, playing on scales and perception to question the place of human beings in our contemporary urban society. With more focus on the details of daily life, coupled with hints of humour, and with a broader scope of media involved, the exhibition appears as a rich but uneven experimental platform. Curated by Leo Chen Li, the exhibition space is divided into two parts representing day and night, or external and inner spaces. In between, a set of flashy orange wires connects them in a clever, original way. The concept of duality is very much present in all of Tsang’s works. In his previous photographic series, such as Landmark (2012), space was divided into infinite sky and high buildings, highlighting the smallness of humans in the context of nature and also of their own constructions. In Floral Fabric (2013-14), the artist underlined …